Red Cross Support For Vulnerable Transgender Community

The earthquakes of Nepal were devastating.

Yet there are groups who can end up suffering more than others.

The transgender community in Nepal has often been ostracized from family and friends, so those who survived in the wake of the Nepal earthquakes are left with no assistance, no aid, no support.

Kathmandu, Nepal - May 14, 2015: Sophie Sumwar, a make up artist touches up her face at the camp where the transgender, gay community is located. - image from ifrc.org

Image from ifrc.org – Kathmandu, Nepal – May 14, 2015: Sophie Sumwar, a make up artist touches up her face at the camp where the transgender, gay community is located.

Who Helps The Marginalized

There is a group who’s mission it is to improve the sexual health, human rights and well-being of sexual and gender minorities in Nepal known as the Blue Diamond Society or BDS.

The BDS attempts to help third-genders, gay men, bisexuals, lesbians, and others with 35 offices spread throughout Nepal. The organization focuses on the rights of those not in binary gender roles and has helped fight battles in the past like having the citizenship ID allow for a third gender.

Unfortunately the initial relief camps set up over Kathmandu were segregated for binary genders which made it difficult for the transgender community to have access to even basics like bathroom use.

Thankfully when the BDS was overwhelmed in their attempts to look after their segregated groups, the Nepal Red Cross Society (NRCS) came to their assistance with extra supplies.

“It’s our duty to support the needs of this vulnerable group. Many transgender people lack support from their families, and are left to fend for themselves even in times like these,” – Tara Bhattarai, Head of Gender and Inclusion Department at the Red Cross.

Things are still rough, with food and supplies being available day by day.

None the less, it’s beautiful to see aid organizations recognizing the needs of the marginalized and doing what they can to adapt to a world, and ensure every human is treated with respect.

“It takes a little bit of change in thinking, and the Red Cross wants to be part of that change.” – Jessica Letch, Gender and Protection Advisor for Red Cross Emergency Earthquake Operations in Nepal.

 

(Source)